Igor Cornelsen, Retired Banker, Current Brazilian Market Analyst – Four Tips Straight From His Mouth

Making a profit through investing in financial markets isn’t necessarily difficult, given one has been exposed to the country’s market they’re investing in for some time. For example, Americans have an advantage over other nationalities when it comes to investing in the United States. Read morE: Igor Cornelsen fala sobre os bancos brasileiros e o que fazer antes de investor

 

Those who haven’t lived in Brazil, done business in the Portuguese-speaking nation, or otherwise kept up with news in the South American country shouldn’t bother investing if expecting to turn a profit worth the time involved to generate such returns.

Igor Cornelsen has many decades’ worth of experience in Brazil’s financial markets. Although he’s retired from the business and no longer is involved with trading securities for large organizations like he used to for several decades, Mr. Cornelsen does provide the world with tips for investing in Brazil’s markets.

Here are four tips sourced directly from Igor Cornelsen for making the right moves when it comes to investing in Brazil’s tough markets.

A finance minister that knows finance could spur growth

Guido Mantega and Joaquim Levy, the two most recent finance ministers in Brazil, didn’t do anything positive for Brazil’s markets – they simply held it stagnant or failed to do anything positive.

If a new finance minister shows his face in Brazil – one that actually has experience in fiscal policy and financial markets – it’s possible that markets could shoot upwards as a result.

China has a lot to do with Brazil

Brazil’s largest trading partner is China, ranging from individuals with portfolios of high value to some of the largest entities throughout the world’s most-populated country. If China does well in virtually anything, so will Brazil.

Brazil’s real isn’t really good

The real, Brazil’s sole currency, isn’t worth its asking price. Stay far, far away from currency swaps, buying and holding the real, or anything else associated with the fiat.

Trust the truest banks

There are nine or ten tried-and-true banks in Brazil. Investors hoping to stash their assets in Brazil should never trust small banks, even if they offer great deals to new account holders.

Learn more about Igor Cornelsen:

https://about.me/igorcornelsen1

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